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This one company charges 15X more than the nearest competition

Question: Is the “work version” of YOU different from the “weekend version”?

Would I even recognize the ‘weekend you'??

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The two versions of me are almost exactly the same:

  • Enthusiastic
  • Technical
  • Open-minded
  • Friendly

So here's the big difference:

The “work me” SELLS products & services (and makes money.)

While the “weekend me” BUYS products and services (and loses money.)

In other words, Friday, Saturday and Sun … I buy lots of stuff.

How much “stuff” are we talking about?

I buy about a million dollars a year of motocross gear, tools, pickup trucks … you know … alll the stuff I “need” to enjoy life.

For example, last Saturday I really “needed” some new tools.

WHOA!!

For $1,200 you don't get much from the SNAP-ON tool company:

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WAIT A SECOND …. SHOULDN'T “14 WRENCHES” COST ABOUT $75?

NO. THE SNAP-ON SALES GUY HITS ME WITH $1,200.

Here's the crazy part about this story …

If you go to Home Depot and buy Husky tools INSTEAD, the same basic thing would have cost $80.

Holy crap … with these SNAP-ON people …

… just 1 wrench costs 76 BUCKS.

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From the AVERAGE BUYERS PERSPECTIVE –

The EXACT SAME TOOL costs 15X more … but it's hard to “see” the difference.

This is no fluke.

SNAP-ON IS A $8 BILLION COMPANY …

… and they know exactly what they are doing.

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Start by thinking about how much YOU charge your customers.

When people say to you, “How much do you charge?” … Well, are you a little nervous? Are you embarrassed?

I'm always nervous when PRICE comes up.

Because my prices often start at a $1 million.

So just imagine when I first got started … how un-smoothly this “price conversation” happened …

BUYER: “Oren, it all sounds good, but how much is your service”

ME: “Oh … the cost? well, glad you asked … it's about ONE MILLION.”

THEN I immediately changed the subject …

Because my “price” was 10X more than they “thought” it would be.

Even the billionaires I deal with don't like to pay this much …

Anyway, I don't have this problem any more.

Today, I don't go near the subject of price … until I re-frame the competition.

Competition is a way bigger issue than “price.”

Oh, and by the way, YOU think you have a lot of competition?

HA. I LAUGH at your competition.

Come work with me for a day.

I'll show you what it feels like to have COMPETITION.

For example…

…. you know that kid who graduated from Stanford last week?? Well, he says he does exactly what I do (only much better.)

Also, JPMorgan and CreditSuisse say they do “the same thing” as I do.

AND so do half the people on Upwork, Fiverr, ZipRecruiter…

… and so does some dude on LinkedIn named “Lucas” from Brazil … he also does “the exact same thing as Oren.”

Completion and Price are tough obstacles.

THIS IS WHY you might want to copy what SNAP-ON does to re-frame the competition and price their products at 15X…

I copied them and it worked perfectly:

FIRST, Anchor your price HIGH Because Price Is A Strong Signal of Product Quality.

You know the story:

  • A $10 wine is a good value, but it probably won’t taste very good.
  • $20 wines probably taste pretty good.
  • $70 is expensive, but I’d buy one for a special occasion.
  • $240 wine? Congrats, I won Dad of the Year … again! 🙂

In other words, your price is a PROXY for how good your product is.

SECOND, You Should Actively Avoid Negotiators, “Debate-Club-Heros” and price-shoppers.

If the Buyer keeps bringing up price one, two, three and four times… DUMP HIM.

I've never seen a REAL BUYER hammer away on price when the other terms were great (financing, services, delivery, guarantees etc.)

You need to find out quickly if a Buyer thinks it's “ok” for you to make money on the deal.

If he literally does not want to take money out of his bank account and put it in yours … dump him.

THIRD, it really matters WHEN you introduce price.

This is a tricky subject – because buyers want to know immediately “how much is it?” So should you cover price in the beginning, half-way through, or at the end?

Think of it like this

1. You should Reveal the Price (or valuation) as the very last discussion item in the meeting.

2. BECAUSE, as soon you disclose the price, they are gone.

(Oh, they might still be on the phone or in the meeting, but they are not paying attention, instead researching other options and trying to validate your pricing.)

HOW TO REVEAL THE PRICE
IS A PSYCHOLOGICAL FORMULA
YOU NEED TO LEARN.

HERE'S WHAT I DISCOVERED ABOUT “REVEALING THE PRICE” THAT IMPROVED MY DEALMAKING:

1. The moment your presentation becomes boring/useless….. you'll start to get questions about price.

2. Buyers who negotiate too hard on price always become rotten apples and you'll wish you never met them.

3. Price is a PROXY for the quality of your product.

4. You should not discuss price until FOUR other topics are fully covered (the first is “your competitors.”)

5. When you REVEAL THE PRICE … the meeting has ended (even if you think it's still going.)

I discovered you cannot sell a big account today UNTIL you can correctly reveal the price of your products and services … and move directly into closing the deal.

I'VE STUDIED THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THIS SUBJECT AND MARRIED MY RESEARCH TO REAL DATA.

I'VE DONE “PRICE REVEALS” ON $2 BILLION OF DEALS.

AND I'M GOING TO SHOW YOU EXACTLY WHAT I'VE LEARNED ABOUT REVEALING THE PRICE.

It's important to avoid mistakes around “price discussions” …

Until someone believes that your product solves their problem, that the competition is irrelevant, that you're an expert in their problem etc etc, … you won't have them interested in your deal — and there's no point getting into “price”

THIS IS A CRITICAL SKILLSET.

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